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Published in B&T Latest News 11 July, 2020 by The bizandtech.net Newswire Staff Comments Off on Bitcoin’s (BTC) Correlation with Gold Weakens, but Strengthens against S&P 500 Stock Market Index in June 2020: Report

Bitcoin’s (BTC) Correlation with Gold Weakens, but Strengthens against S&P 500 Stock Market Index in June 2020: Report

Bitcoin (BTC), the flagship cryptocurrency’s correlation with gold has weakened following the COVID-19 outbreak and resulting economic uncertainty. However, the digital asset’s correlation with the S&P 500 stock market index appears to be getting stronger, according to research report from crypto exchange Kraken. Kraken Intelligence,… Read More

The post Bitcoin’s (BTC) Correlation with Gold Weakens, but Strengthens against S&P 500 Stock Market Index in June 2020: Report appeared first on Crowdfund Insider.

Published in B&T Latest News 11 July, 2020 by The bizandtech.net Newswire Staff Comments Off on Cisco’s Webex videoconferencing software now lets you set virtual backgrounds

Cisco’s Webex videoconferencing software now lets you set virtual backgrounds

As it tries to catch up with the popular features offered by some of its younger competitors, Cisco’s Webex has unveiled virtual backgrounds for its videoconferences. Users can either apply a “blur” effect to mask their background or replace with one of Webex’s preset background images.

Zoom, the most popular videoconferencing app of the moment, and rivals Google Meet and Microsoft Teams all allow users to upload their own custom images for background displays.

Webex is one of the oldest players in the videoconferencing space. It was founded in 1995 and acquired by Cisco in 2007 for $3.2 billion. It’s primarily used as a business application and has a focus on companies, rather than personal customers, but has increased the features…

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Published in B&T Latest News 11 July, 2020 by The bizandtech.net Newswire Staff Comments Off on Crypto Derivatives Exchange LedgerX and Options Benchmarking Specialist T3 Propose New Bitcoin (BTC) Volatility Index

Crypto Derivatives Exchange LedgerX and Options Benchmarking Specialist T3 Propose New Bitcoin (BTC) Volatility Index

LedgerX, a regulated cryptocurrency derivatives exchange, will be partnering with T3 in order to launch a new Bitcoin (BTC) volatility index. Zach Dexter, CEO at LedgerX, said that, initially, the index will just be a reference for digital asset traders. LedgerX and T3, a research-focused… Read More

The post Crypto Derivatives Exchange LedgerX and Options Benchmarking Specialist T3 Propose New Bitcoin (BTC) Volatility Index appeared first on Crowdfund Insider.

Published in B&T Featured Lists 2 July, 2020 by BT Featured Staff Comments Off on Bitcoin Daily: Chinese Authorities Reportedly Seized Crypto OTC Trader; Salesforce Co-founder Debuts Programmable Blockchain Platform

Bitcoin Daily: Chinese Authorities Reportedly Seized Crypto OTC Trader; Salesforce Co-founder Debuts Programmable Blockchain Platform

In China, crypto over-the-counter (OTC) traders are being arrested in an attempt to crack down on illegal transactions, according to a report from CoinDesk.

Prominent OTC trader Zhao Dong, of crypto lending platform RenrenBit, was held up by police in the city of Hangzhou, the report says. Zhao has a prominent status among the community, and rumors online began to circulate. One poster relayed the information that one OTC trading desk in Beijing, not named, had its whole team arrested by police last month, CoinDesk said.

According to RenrenBit, Zhao has been released and is now assisting police in investigations on anti-fraud and anti-money laundering issues, CoinDesk reported.

A person with inside information about the matter, who remained anonymous in the CoinDesk report, said Chinese authorities had begun to take a harder look at many cryptocurrency firms.

This action follows a June event in which many accounts were frozen in connection with suspicions of illegal activity occurring in conjunction with them. Cryptocurrencies, particularly the dollar-pegged USDT, have been known methods to facilitate Ponzi schemes or fraud in China, CoinDesk reports.

Salesforce co-founder and CNET founder Halsey Minor has a new project going — a public blockchain network with dollars baked in, CoinDesk reported.

The network is called Public Mint, and according to CoinDesk, it is a programmable blockchain with fiat funds held in insured banks. That will let users create their own “digital money systems.” Users would be able to trade with regular U.S. dollars on their smartphones, while the funds would be held centrally by custodians.

There is expected to be more support added later for other currencies, CoinDesk reports.

Public Mint says it’s supported by up to 200 banks that are not named in the platform’s press release.

The platform says it could be used as a solution for crypto firms having trouble utilizing traditional banks.

Published in B&T Featured Lists 16 October, 2018 by BT Featured Staff Comments Off on Blockchain media startup Civil is issuing full refunds to all buyers of its cryptocurrency

Blockchain media startup Civil is issuing full refunds to all buyers of its cryptocurrency

Many doubted The Civil Media Company‘s ambitious plan to sell $8 million worth of its cryptocurrency, called CVL. 

The skeptics, as it turns out, were right. Civil’s initial coin offering, meant to fund the company’s effort to create a new economy for journalism using the blockchain, failed to attract sufficient interest. The company announced today that it would provide refunds to all CVL token buyers by October 29.

Civil’s goal was to sell 34 million CVL tokens for between $8 million and $24 million. The sale began on September 18 and concluded yesterday. Ultimately, 1,012 buyers purchased $1,435,491 worth of CVL tokens. A spokesperson for Civil told TechCrunch an additional 1,738 buyers successfully registered for the sale, but never completed their transaction.

Civil isn’t giving up. The company says “a new, much simpler token sale is in the works,” details of which will be shared soon. Once those new tokens are distributed, Civil will launch three new features: a blockchain-publishing plugin for WordPress, a community governance application called The Civil Registry and a developer tool for non-blockchain developers to build apps on Civil.

ConsenSys, a blockchain venture studio that invested $5 million in Civil last fall, has agreed to purchase $3.5 million worth of those new tokens. The purchase is not an equity; all capital from the token sale is committed to the Civil Foundation, an independent nonprofit initially funded by Civil that funds grants to the newsrooms in Civil’s network.

In a blog post today, Civil chief executive officer Matthew Iles wrote that the token sale failure was a disappointment but not a shock. Days prior, he’d authored a separate post where he admitted things weren’t looking good.

“This isn’t how we saw this going,” Iles wrote. “The numbers will show clearly enough that we are not where we wanted to be at this point in the sale when we started out. But one thing we want to say at the top is that until the clock strikes midnight on Monday, we are still working nonstop on the goal of making our soft cap of $8 million.”

A recent Wall Street Journal report claimed Civil had reached out to The New York Times, The Washington Post, Dow Jones and Axios, among others, but failed to incite interest in its token.

Separate from its token sale, Civil has inked strategic partnerships with media companies like the Associated Press and Forbes, both of which confirmed to TechCrunch today that the failed token sale doesn’t impact their partnerships with Civil. 

Civil, the blockchain journalism startup, has partnered with one of the oldest names in media

Forbes became the first major media brand to test Civil’s technology when it announced earlier this month that it would experiment with publishing content to the Civil platform. As for the AP, it granted the newsrooms in Civil’s network licenses to its content. 

Civil, of course, isn’t the only blockchain startup targeting journalism. Nwzer, Userfeeds, Factmata and Po.et, which was founded by Jarrod Dicker, a former vice president at The Washington Post, are all trying their hand at bringing the new technology to the content industry.

Which, if any, will actually find success in the complicated space, is the question.


Published in B&T Featured Lists 16 October, 2018 by The bizandtech.net Newswire Staff Comments Off on Blockchain media startup Civil is issuing full refunds to all buyers of its cryptocurrency

Blockchain media startup Civil is issuing full refunds to all buyers of its cryptocurrency

Many doubted The Civil Media Company‘s ambitious plan to sell $8 million worth of its cryptocurrency, called CVL. 

The skeptics, as it turns out, were right. Civil’s initial coin offering, meant to fund the company’s effort to create a new economy for journalism using the blockchain, failed to attract sufficient interest. The company announced today that it would provide refunds to all CVL token buyers by October 29.

Civil’s goal was to sell 34 million CVL tokens for between $8 million and $24 million. The sale began on September 18 and concluded yesterday. Ultimately, 1,012 buyers purchased $1,435,491 worth of CVL tokens. A spokesperson for Civil told TechCrunch an additional 1,738 buyers successfully registered for the sale, but never completed their transaction.

Civil isn’t giving up. The company says “a new, much simpler token sale is in the works,” details of which will be shared soon. Once those new tokens are distributed, Civil will launch three new features: a blockchain-publishing plugin for WordPress, a community governance application called The Civil Registry and a developer tool for non-blockchain developers to build apps on Civil.

ConsenSys, a blockchain venture studio that invested $5 million in Civil last fall, has agreed to purchase $3.5 million worth of those new tokens. The purchase is not an equity; all capital from the token sale is committed to the Civil Foundation, an independent nonprofit initially funded by Civil that funds grants to the newsrooms in Civil’s network.

In a blog post today, Civil chief executive officer Matthew Iles wrote that the token sale failure was a disappointment but not a shock. Days prior, he’d authored a separate post where he admitted things weren’t looking good.

“This isn’t how we saw this going,” Iles wrote. “The numbers will show clearly enough that we are not where we wanted to be at this point in the sale when we started out. But one thing we want to say at the top is that until the clock strikes midnight on Monday, we are still working nonstop on the goal of making our soft cap of $8 million.”

A recent Wall Street Journal report claimed Civil had reached out to The New York Times, The Washington Post, Dow Jones and Axios, among others, but failed to incite interest in its token.

Separate from its token sale, Civil has inked strategic partnerships with media companies like the Associated Press and Forbes, both of which confirmed to TechCrunch today that the failed token sale doesn’t impact their partnerships with Civil. 

Civil, the blockchain journalism startup, has partnered with one of the oldest names in media

Forbes became the first major media brand to test Civil’s technology when it announced earlier this month that it would experiment with publishing content to the Civil platform. As for the AP, it granted the newsrooms in Civil’s network licenses to its content. 

Civil, of course, isn’t the only blockchain startup targeting journalism. Nwzer, Userfeeds, Factmata and Po.et, which was founded by Jarrod Dicker, a former vice president at The Washington Post, are all trying their hand at bringing the new technology to the content industry.

Which, if any, will actually find success in the complicated space, is the question.


Published in B&T Resources 4 November, 2018 by The bizandtech.net Newswire Staff Comments Off on Built With

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Published in B&T Resources 15 May, 2018 by The bizandtech.net Newswire Staff Comments Off on Product Hunt

Product Hunt

Product Hunt surfaces the best new products, every day. It’s a place for product-loving enthusiasts to share and geek out about the latest mobile apps, websites, hardware projects, and tech creations.

Published in B&T Resources 15 May, 2018 by The bizandtech.net Newswire Staff Comments Off on Product Hunt

Product Hunt

Product Hunt surfaces the best new products, every day. It’s a place for product-loving enthusiasts to share and geek out about the latest mobile apps, websites, hardware projects, and tech creations.

Published in Business Features · Publishing And Distribution 21 March, 2014 by The bizandtech.net Newswire Staff

Beacon Wants To Help Journalists Generate Revenue

While newspapers everywhere are doing their best to emulate the New York Times by erecting a one-size-fits-all paywall around their content, some individual writers like Andrew Sullivan are trying to create their own personal sites where readers can subscribe to their content. And then there’s a startup called Beacon: it wants to find a middle way between those two approaches — a site that has multiple authors, with a paywall can be unlocked by subscribing to any of them individually, and a pool of revenue that all the writers share in.

English: A photo of author and political comme...

English: A photo of author and political commentator Andrew Sullivan. Taken in Amsterdam, Holland with a Nikon D2Xs. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Each of the site’s journalists (there are currently about 50) has a page where their content lives, and a discussion forum. When someone subscribes to them for $5 a month, Beacon takes a cut — the amount is in flux, but writers keep around 60 percent on average — and then the reader gets access to all of the site’s other writers. Some of the proceeds from each subscription also go into a pool that is shared by all of the journalists on the platform.

Beacon

The site, which launched about a month and a half ago, was started by a team of three: Adrian Sanders and his partner Dmitri Cherniak, and former Facebook managing editor and Bloomberg social-media guy Dan Fletcher. Beacon actually grew out of an earlier project that Sanders and Cherniak had worked on called Backspaces, an iPhone app that was designed to help users upload multiple photos and use them to tell stories.

Connecting with fans instead of ads Adrian Sanders

Adrian Sanders

In an interview earlier this week, Sanders said that the Backspaces app didn’t really take off — and didn’t have much of a business model — but he and Cherniak noticed that some of the writers and photographers using the service had created incredible stories, and that some had thousands of followers who came back repeatedly to see what they had uploaded. If only there was a way for them to make a living while doing that, he thought.

 

“There were a few who were getting 10,000 unique views every time they posted something, and it was the same 10,000 people — but every time I ran the numbers on trying to monetize it through display ads or whatever, it came down to pennies.”

So Sanders and Cherniak (who handles the technical side of Beacon) decided that connecting with those 10,000 fans was the only way that writers could ever make any money — a variation on former Wired magazine editor Kevin Kelly’s theory that all an artist needs is “a thousand true fans.” Sanders contacted Fletcher, who had just left his post as Facebook’s managing editor, and the three started what would become Beacon.

paidContent Live 2013 Andrew Sullivan The Dish

Andrew Sullivan, Editor, The Dish paidContent Live 2013 Albert Chau / itsmebert.com

In a nutshell, Sanders said, the idea was to help bring the Andrew Sullivan model within the reach of other writers and journalists who might not be able to command the same type of audience — and might not want to take on the challenge of building a business around themselves, as Sullivan has done — but who still have readers who want to help them.

“We looked at Sullivan as sort of the model coming into it. But when we talked to writers, there was so much hesitancy — if you don’t have that platform to begin with, and don’t have that following that he has, to sort of go it alone and set all that up, that’s a really intimidating notion. Constructing this kind of collective on the writer’s side took some of the fear out of the equation.”

Journalists want to go direct Dan Fletcher

Dan Fletcher

Fletcher, for his part, says that working at Facebook was interesting but he was primarily helping to produce branded content through the company’s “Facebook Stories” feature, and wanted to get back to helping journalism survive in a digital age. He said that working at Facebook made him realize that “tech companies aren’t going to invest in the future of editorial.” Using contacts that Fletcher had from his days with Time Inc., the team reached out to about 50 journalists they knew who focused mostly on foreign affairs coverage — in part because that was where they had contacts, and in part because they believed that freelancers writing about those topics are doing something important, but often find it hard to get paid or make a living. Said Sanders:

“We sat down with a guy who commands $3 a word, and he said for one thing it’s increasingly harder to get the rates I used to — in order to create $500 worth of value through my stories, I probably need to shop that idea or article to 15 to 20 editors, and then I might hear back from maybe four of them, and maybe one will convert, and I never know when that is. With Beacon, if I know that every month I’m getting paid and growing subscribers.”

Beacon isn’t trying to replace existing outlets that freelancers like Mujib Mashal might work for, Fletcher said — it’s just trying to supplement that existence with something more regular, and something that involves writers connecting directly with their loyal fans. In a sense, it’s a variation on the “personal paywall” or velvet rope approach to monetization that I’ve promoted in the past, only it’s a startup instead of a newspaper.

Beacon2

Like Kickstarter, but more dependable

For journalists who don’t have the clout or the entrepreneurial spirit that Andrew Sullivan has, and who either don’t want or can’t get a staff job at the New York Times or some other mainstream publication, a Beacon-style model seems like a viable alternative that allows them to tap into their existing fan base and set up their own mini-paywall (and they still own the rights to all of their content).

In a sense, Beacon is like Kickstarter for journalists, but instead of having to come up with a new project each time they want to go to their readers for funding, writers can attract more regular ongoing support (the platform is currently invitation only, although would-be members can submit an application).

Can Beacon find enough readers who are willing to pay, when every other site seems to want to put up paywalls as well — and some of those cost less than $5 a month? And even if it succeeds, will it be enough to make a difference for the journalists involved? That remains to be seen, but it’s a fascinating experiment regardless. As Sanders put it:

“Dan’s not Glenn Greenwald and I’m not Pierre Omidyar sitting here with $250 million dollars in cash. We’re saying let’s see if this model makes sense and grows — you’re always going to have billionaires with some new project, but those don’t necessarily define a new economic model. We are here to facilitate the relationship between the reader and the writer in a way that’s economically viable for the writer and creates value for the reader.”

Post and thumbnail photos courtesy of Shutterstock / Daniilantiq, as well as Albert Chau


    

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Published in Audio And Video 17 September, 2011 by James McBride

Publishers Can Now Sell And Rent Video On Facebook Using Ooyala

Image representing Ooyala as depicted in Crunc...

Image via CrunchBase

Video publishing platform Ooyala recently launched Ooyala Social, a new HD-quality Social TV experience that brings video sharing and and viewing to Facebook.

The service specializes in hosting videos for corporate and media entities such as Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Dell, General Mills and ESPN. Content owners can now use Ooyala Social to make premium on-demand and live video available on Facebook via rentals, subscriptions, purchases, and and more. [Read more →]

Published in Uncategorized 2 August, 2011 by The bizandtech.net Newswire Staff Comments Off on T-Mobile To Make Carrier Billing An Option For Online Purchases

T-Mobile To Make Carrier Billing An Option For Online Purchases

T-Mobile

Every phone geek loves to debate how long it’ll be before we’ve trashed our wallets in favor of paying for stuff with our phones in the real world — but what about online?

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